Jeudi, avril 17, 2014
anthesia:

Peach-faced love bir Amazing World

anthesia:

Peach-faced love bir Amazing World

(Source : our-amazing-world)

Mercredi, avril 16, 2014
pearl-nautilus:

Opening Page Illumination from the manuscript of the Shahnama of Firdawsi  Iran, Shiraz, Timurid Period, 15th century c. 1444 

pearl-nautilus:

Opening Page Illumination from the manuscript of the Shahnama of Firdawsi  Iran, Shiraz, Timurid Period, 15th century c. 1444 

(Source : acheiropoietos)

becausebirds:

The magical Tufted Coquette! This beautiful hummingbird can be found sipping nectar in South America.

Love is an act of endless forgiveness, a tender look which becomes a habit. Peter Ustinov (via itsquoted)

youngparis:

Cocoon and Evolved Metallic Mechanitis Butterfly Chrysalis from Costa Rica

hymnoptera:

theowlhooteth:

marsiouxpial:

Photomicrograph of insect wings (via National Media Museum)
William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877)Collection of National Media MuseumPhotomicrograph of insect wings, as seen in a solar microscope.
(via ghostcafe)

hymnoptera:

theowlhooteth:

marsiouxpial:

Photomicrograph of insect wings (via National Media Museum)

William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877)

Collection of National Media Museum


Photomicrograph of insect wings, as seen in a solar microscope.

(via ghostcafe)

nybg:

tangledwing:

"Studies of Peonies", about 1472 - 1473. Martin Schongauer.  According to the folks who keep track of such things, this picture is one of the earliest surviving northern European botanical studies drawn from life

I love when you see a piece of art that is over 500 years old, and you don’t even need to hesitate before saying, “What a lovely peony!” This botanical study is making the Tumblr rounds again (it’s a perennial favorite, heh). It is a beautiful work held by the J. Paul Getty Museum in California, and the Getty does call it one of the earliest botanical prints known. This little work was originally done as a study for a larger work, called the The Madonna of the Rose Garden. Apparently during the Middle Ages it was common to paint the Virgin Mary within or near an enclosed garden as a metaphor for the Immaculate Conception. Amazing what you can learn just in researching a pretty little painting! ~AR

nybg:

tangledwing:

"Studies of Peonies", about 1472 - 1473. Martin Schongauer.  According to the folks who keep track of such things, this picture is one of the earliest surviving northern European botanical studies drawn from life

I love when you see a piece of art that is over 500 years old, and you don’t even need to hesitate before saying, “What a lovely peony!” This botanical study is making the Tumblr rounds again (it’s a perennial favorite, heh). It is a beautiful work held by the J. Paul Getty Museum in California, and the Getty does call it one of the earliest botanical prints known. This little work was originally done as a study for a larger work, called the The Madonna of the Rose Garden. Apparently during the Middle Ages it was common to paint the Virgin Mary within or near an enclosed garden as a metaphor for the Immaculate Conception. Amazing what you can learn just in researching a pretty little painting! ~AR

gacougnol:

Walk the line by Darragh Hehir

gacougnol:

Walk the line by Darragh Hehir

onlyoldphotography:

Vivian Maier: Untitled, January 1956

onlyoldphotography:

Vivian Maier: Untitled, January 1956

lesmanguesitaliennes:

Glenn Gould - Bach